The Morning After the Night Before

I don’t drink. That’s right, not at all. A lot of people seem to struggle with the concept of not drinking at all and I’m pretty sure that says more about them, than me. I’ve had medical professionals be shocked because “people like me” usually drink and shouldn’t. When I say I don’t they have responded with “ok, but you shouldn’t drink at all if you can help it” like I don’t drink means I drink sometimes. Then there are the other times…taxi journeys where the driver brings up being a student in a city, and the night life. When I say I don’t go out they will usually go down the lines of “so you’re a pub girl”. No, not particularly. Next it’s “so do you just drink at home?”, followed by “a student that doesn’t drink, that’s odd!”.

It isn’t actually odd. I imagine many more students don’t drink that we would expect. My reasons for not drinking are complicated. I always say it is because of issues people in my life have had with alcohol and that it has put me off, but that would be a stretch of the truth. I want to say it is because when I first developed mental health problems at 14, I used to sneak alcohol out of my Mum’s vodka supply and take it to school in a water bottle and one time I went to a small party, got drunk, had a meltdown and locked myself in a bathroom, but again, the fact that drinking probably wouldn’t be good for me has very little to do with not actually drinking…just a lot to do with why it is probably a good thing. The honest reason is that it is a part of my eating disorder I have never overcome and really don’t feel a need to.

I didn’t go through the whole turning 18 and going out thing. I was at home starving myself to death, isolating myself from everyone and everything, and in my mind alcohol = a waste of calories. Why would I drink alcohol when I was only allowing myself 200 calories per day? Two vodkas and that would be all I could consume for the day. No thanks. And now I am “better” I challenge all of my disordered behaviours and thoughts, but with this one I just have no desire to. Take avoiding eating desserts. I have bundles of motivation to challenge that because you know, desserts are amazing and I genuinely want to be able to eat them. Hello cheesecake my long lost friend! But I’ve never enjoyed alcohol and it doesn’t interest me. I feel like I would be forcing myself to drink for the sake of drinking.

I do, however, know the feeling of the morning after the night before because having borderline personality disorder is great like that.

My mornings after the night before are filled with shame, embarrassment, and regret, and it is horrendous. Even months later the memories fill me with these emotions and when it is immediately after it quite literally makes me feel sick. I had one of these episodes this weekend. I won’t be going into the details because honestly, I am ashamed, and I really excelled myself this time. It went to a whole new level and the only thing I can think of to make myself feel better is ‘I won’t ever have to see the people involved again”. It has been a truly rock bottom moment and when it hit me what was going on and where I had led myself, I almost thought I was dreaming.

It is hard not to absolutely hate yourself for how you behave and feel at your worst. I feel like I want to rewind time and grab my own shoulders and give myself a good shake. WHAT ARE YOU DOING YOU FOOL?! Don’t be an idiot. Pull yourself together. Stop being so angry and take help.

However, there is a fine line between taking responsibility for your behaviour when you are mentally struggling, and blaming yourself to the point of hating yourself. While I absolutely believe I need to feel some degree of shame and regret in order to change, hating myself and over worrying about the way I was and the state others saw me in (aka what they were thinking of me) is not helpful; it makes me worse not better.

So after you have had a blip, a lapse, an episode or whatever else you want to call it, it is healthy to have some regrets and it’s a good thing to consider how you could have prevented yourself from getting to the stage of being out of control. BUT, if you blame yourself too much and are too hard on yourself, the guilt is going to eat you alive and you’re going to end up having another blip to cope with the guilt. Say your issue is drinking, and you get drunk and do something stupid and feel far too much guilt and self-blame…the risk is that you’re going to end up drinking again to manage that guilt. It’s counter-productive.

The line is fine and difficult to find, but it is a part of ‘recovery’ that you are going to have to keep working on because it is absolutely key to getting better. It’s all really about radical acceptance after these blips; you cannot change what has happened, and while you don’t have to be ok with what happened, you cannot punish yourself for it.

Learn. That is what you can do. Life is a series of lessons.

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